The funeral of Alejo Naborí, one of the three priests murdered in Mexico this year

Mexico remains the most dangerous country in the world for Catholic priests, according to a report from the Catholic Church that calls out the government for its lack of action in the face of rising violence against religious officials. 

This year was the most deadly year for priests in Mexico since the Catholic Church started keeping count, and this is the eighth consecutive year that Mexico has been labelled the most dangerous country in the world for religious officials -- a macabre trend that began soon after the launch of the militarized crackdown on drug cartels ten years ago.

Three priests were murdered this year -- two in Veracruz and another in Michoacán -- and the report states that four catechists were also killed. 

A total of 61 attacks occurred against church members in Mexico between 1990 and 2016, according to the report published by the Catholic Media Center (Centro Católico Mulitmedial), showing an alarming increase of 375 percent over that time period in the number of priests who have been murdered.

According to the report, "the vast majority of these cases presented a modus operandi: threats, extortion, kidnapping, torture and assassination." The most violent areas are Guerrero and Mexico City, with eight registered attacks in each since 1990, followed by Veracruz and Michoacán with seven and six respectively.

Moreover, reported extortions rose by 70 percent this year, according to the Catholic Church, which states that although organized crime was responsible for most of these acts, members of the security forces were also reportedly involved in some cases.

Based on the data collected over the past four years, the study estimates that the violence against Catholic Chruch workers will increase by 100 percent during Enrique Peña Nieto's presidency, rendering the current administration as the most dangerous for priests in Mexico since records began. Some 25 attacks against church officials have already been recorded during the four first years of Peña Nieto's government. 

The report criticizes the Mexican government's lack of response to these incidents, which it claims are increasing in part due to the criminal impunity that persists. More than 80 percent of the murders of priests have been left unresolved.

"This increasing phenomenon is the result of the Mexican government's inability to control the overflowing violence caused by organized crime in specific areas of the country." 

InSight Crime Analysis

Church members in Mexico -- still a deeply conservative and Catholic country -- hold visible and respected positions within communities, and priests have long used their role to defend human rights. They are often on the frontlines of defense between their parishes and organized crime, which puts them directly in the crosshairs.

The trends of rising violence against church officials documented by the report are symbolic of Mexico's generally worsening security situation and the government's apparent inability to efficiently tackle organized crime. A report published this year argued that the country's impunity rate reached 99 percent, which explains why the murders of so many priests murders go unsolved.

SEE ALSO: Mexico News and Profiles

General levels of violence in Mexico have risen over the past decade since the launch of a militarized crackdown against organized crime. Homicides did drop during the early part of Peña Nieto's government, but began to rise again in the middle of this year. August and September 2016 were the most violent months in Mexico since 1997. As long as the generalised climate of insecurity and high homicides in Mexico persists, it's likely that priests will continue to be targeted.

 

Investigations

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
Prev Next

El Salvador Prisons and the Battle for the MS13’s Soul

El Salvador Prisons and the Battle for the MS13’s Soul

El Salvador's prison system is the headquarters of the country's largest gangs. It is also where one of these gangs, the MS13, is fighting amongst itself for control of the organization.

'MS13 Members Imprisoned in El Salvador Can Direct the Gang in the US'

'MS13 Members Imprisoned in El Salvador Can Direct the Gang in the US'

Special Agent David LeValley headed the criminal division of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) Washington office until last November 8. While in office, he witnessed the rise of the MS13, the Barrio 18 (18th Street) and other smaller gangs in the District of Columbia as well...

Reign of the Kaibil: Guatemala’s Prisons Under Byron Lima

Reign of the Kaibil: Guatemala’s Prisons Under Byron Lima

Following Guatemala's long and brutal civil war, members of the military were charged, faced trial and sentenced to jail time. Even some members of a powerful elite unit known as the Kaibil were put behind bars. Among these prisoners, none were more emblematic than Captain Byron Lima...

Homicides in Guatemala: Introduction, Methodology, and Major Findings

Homicides in Guatemala: Introduction, Methodology, and Major Findings

When violence surged in early 2015 in Guatemala, then-President Otto Pérez Molina knew how to handle the situation: Blame the street gangs. 

Homicides in Guatemala: Analyzing the Data

Homicides in Guatemala: Analyzing the Data

In the last decade, homicides in Guatemala have obeyed a fairly steady pattern. Guatemala City and some of its surrounding municipalities have the greatest sheer number of homicides. Other states, particularly along the eastern border have the highest homicide rates. Among these are the departments of Escuintla...

The Prison Dilemma: Latin America’s Incubators of Organized Crime

The Prison Dilemma: Latin America’s Incubators of Organized Crime

The prison system in Latin America and the Caribbean has become a prime incubator for organized crime. This overview -- the first of six reports on prison systems that we produced after a year-long investigation -- traces the origins and maps the consequences of the problem, including...

How the MS13 Got Its Foothold in Transnational Drug Trafficking

How the MS13 Got Its Foothold in Transnational Drug Trafficking

Throughout the continent, the debate on whether or not the Mara Salvatrucha (MS13) gang is working with or for drug traffickers continues. In this investigation, journalist Carlos García tells the story of how a member of the MS13 entered the methamphetamine distribution business under the powerful auspices...

How the MS13 Tried (and Failed) to Create a Single Gang in the US

How the MS13 Tried (and Failed) to Create a Single Gang in the US

In July 2011, members of the Mara Salvatrucha (MS13) attended a meeting organized in California by a criminal known as "Bad Boy." Among the invitees was José Juan Rodríguez Juárez, known as "Dreamer," who had gone to the meeting hoping to better understand what was beginning to...

The MS13 Moves (Again) to Expand on US East Coast

The MS13 Moves (Again) to Expand on US East Coast

Local police and justice officials are convinced that the Mara Salvatrucha (MS13) has strengthened its presence along the East Coast of the United States. The alarm follows a recent spate of violence -- of the type not seen in a decade -- which included dismembered bodies and...

The Lucky ‘Kingpin’: How ‘Chepe Diablo’ Has (So Far) Ridiculed Justice

The Lucky ‘Kingpin’: How ‘Chepe Diablo’ Has (So Far) Ridiculed Justice

José Adán Salazar Umaña is the only Salvadoran citizen currently on the US government's Kingpin List. But in his defense, Salazar Umaña claims is he is an honorable businessman who started his career by exchanging money along the borders between Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras. He does...