Mexico News

Mexico's Knights Templar Leader Vows to Never Surrender

Mexico's Knights Templar Leader Vows to Never Surrender

The head of Mexican criminal group the Knights Templar, "La Tuta," has vowed to "fight to the end" in a defiant rant released at a time when staying quiet and rebuilding his forces may actually be the better option for the beseiged gang. Read More

Mexico Profile

Mexico

Mexico

Mexico is home to the hemisphere’s largest, most sophisticated and violent organized criminal gangs. These organizations have drawn from Mexico’s long history of smuggling and its close proximity to the United States, the world’s largest economy, to grow into a regional threat. Their networks stretch from Argentina into Canada and Europe. They traffic in illegal drugs, contraband, arms and humans, and launder their proceeds through regional moneychangers, banks and local economic projects. Their armament, training and tactics have become increasingly sophisticated as the Mexican government has ramped up efforts to combat them, and they have faced increased competition within Mexico. They have penetrated the police and border patrols on nearly every level, in some cases starting with recruits for these units. They play political and social roles in some areas, operating as the de facto security forces.

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  • Mexico's Knights Templar Leader Vows to Never Surrender

    Knights Templar leader "La Tuta" enjoys the media spotlight

    The head of Mexican criminal group the Knights Templar, "La Tuta," has vowed to "fight to the end" in a defiant rant released at a time when staying quiet and rebuilding his forces may actually be the better option for the beseiged gang.

  • Mexico Crime Survey Reveals Conflicting Trends

    22.4 million Mexicans told the Envipe that they had been victims of a crime in the past year

    Mexico’s declining murder rate counts as a major accomplishment for President Enrique Peña Nieto, but the nation’s annual victimization survey indicates that the country remains beset by violent crime.

  • Mass Graves, Disappearances Signal Trouble for Guerrero, Mexico

    Police record another clandestine grave in Guerrero

    With more than 150 bodies reportedly found in clandestine graves and 240 people missing thus far this year in Guerrero, Mexico, it is clear the southwest Pacific state has turned into a hotbed for criminal activity, thanks to a potent mix of criminal gangs and official corruption.

  • Mexico Blames Mayor, Wife in Missing Students Case

    Iguala mayor Jose Luis Abarca Velazquez and his wife, Maria de los Angeles Pineda Villa

    Authorities in Mexico have accused the former mayor of Iguala of ordering the attack against 43 students who went missing in the state of Guerrero, another revelation regarding the depth of official collusion with organized crime in the region.

  • Mexican Govt Commission Confirms Army Massacre

    The warehouse in Tlatlaya where the massacre took place

    Mexico's National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) has determined that the army summarily executed 15 of the 22 suspects killed in a warehouse in June this year, confirming another case of grave human rights abuse by the security forces, a month after the disappearance of 43 students.

  • US Police Corrupted by Mexico's Cartels Along Border

    Would you want this man as sheriff?

    The corrupting power of Mexican drug traffickers is finding its way into the police forces of the southern United States. An investigation by the Dromomanos collective, winner of the Ortega y Gasset Journalism Awards, published in El Universal, reveals drug traffickers have bribed a large number of sheriffs, border patrol officers, and customs officials in Texas.

  • Murder of Mexico Vigilante Leader Underscores Legalization Issues

    Rural Defense Force leader Felipe Diaz Avila

    The murder of a Rural Defense Force commander in Mexico has reignited the debate over the legalization of vigilante forces, highlighting the lack of resources and protection afforded to those who have laid down their weapons to join official units.

  • Criminals Turn to Metal Theft as Mexico Underworld Fragments

    Criminal groups in Mexico target electrical towers

    Criminal groups are reportedly stealing and selling parts of electrical towers in northern Mexico, in yet another example of these organizations looking for new revenue streams as the country's underworld fragments. 

  • Guerreros Unidos Leader Captured As Search for Missing Students Continues

    Police arrested in student disappearances case

    Authorities in Mexico have captured an alleged leader of the criminal group Guerreros Unidos, who have been accused of collaborating with police in the disappearance of dozens of student protestors in Guerrero state.

  • Mexico Needlessly Plans to Alter Justice Agency

    Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has put forward a plan to radically reshape the nation’s Justice Department, the latest example of a long national pattern of unnecessary institutional reform disguised as progress.