Uruguay News

Uruguay Police Smuggled Weapons to Brazil

Uruguay Police Smuggled Weapons to Brazil

Uruguay authorities are investigating police accused of trafficking some 300 weapons to Brazil, an indication that the most heavily armed country in South America -- in terms of per capita gun ownership -- may also serve as a valuable source of weaponry for criminal groups.  Read More

Uruguay Profile

Uruguay

Uruguay

Known as "the Switzerland of Latin America," Uruguay has some of the lowest crime rates and strongest state institutions in the region. At the same time, however, the historically peaceful country is undergoing a steady rise in crime and insecurity, much of which is linked to drug trafficking and small-scale gang activity. The country -- which is testing some of the most liberal laws regarding drug production, distribution and consumption -- is under a microscope to see whether changing drug laws can impact crime levels.

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More Uruguay News

  • Uruguay Police Smuggled Weapons to Brazil

    Uruguay authorities are investigating police accused of trafficking some 300 weapons to Brazil, an indication that the most heavily armed country in South America -- in terms of per capita gun ownership -- may also serve as a valuable source of weaponry for criminal groups. 

  • Uruguay Targets Motorcycles in Effort to Fight Crime

    Police in Uruguay stopping a motorcycle rider during the operation

    Security forces in Uruguay have seized nearly 400 motorcycles in an operation meant to combat contract killings and robberies, one sign of the concern over rising violence in one of Latin America's safest countries.

  • Using Data to Predict and Prevent Crime in LatAm

    An example of a crime heat map created by PredPol software

    Can Latin America see greater success in reducing urban crime and violence by emphasizing data collection and analysis? InSight Crime takes a look at three such initiatives in the region. 

  • Uruguay Sees Homicide Uptick under Mujica

    Outgoing Uruguayan President Jose Mujica

    Uruguay has seen a record level of homicides during the term of outgoing President Jose Mujica, and rising violence will be a key challenge for his successor Tabare Vazquez, as well as for the future of the country's marijuana legalization policy.

  • Uruguay Soccer Clubs Involved in Drug Trafficking: Police

    Members of Uruguayan "barras bravas"

    Police in Uruguay have evidence that more than 400 people -- among them members of soccer fan clubs, soccer team directors, and at least one politician -- are involved in trafficking drugs and weapons, an intersection between soccer and organized crime that has also been seen in neighboring Argentina. 

  • As Uruguay Elections Near, Is Marijuana Law Under Threat?

    Presidential candidate Luis Lacalle Pou

    The two leading presidential candidates in Uruguay have expressed doubts about the country's landmark marijuana legalization law. Will the marijuana laws likely be scaled back, or is this simply politicking?

  • Uruguay Presidential Candidate Proposes Rehab for Marijuana Users

    The Uruguayan presidential candidate favored by drug policy reform advocates, ex-President Tabare Vazquez, has presented his rehabilitative interpretation of what marijuana regulation would look like if he wins the upcoming elections, irritating some cannabis activists and undermining users’ faith in the state registry.

  • Uruguay Marijuana Law Under Fire

    When Uruguay's historic marijuana regulation law passed the Senate in December, it was a major victory for drug policy reform in Uruguay and around the world. To many analysts, the hard part appeared to be over. Though it took some arm-twisting in the lower house, the ruling Broad Front (Frente Amplio) coalition had managed to pass the bill and the likely next president, ex-President Tabare Vazquez, had endorsed it as well.

  • Uruguay Didn't Want to Legalize Marijuana (But Did it Anyway)

    Nelly Santos was worriedly waiting for her son to come home after receiving a call from his school. Daniel arrived with his head lowered, his cap visor covering his face and his eyes reddened. He'd been caught smoking marijuana with some other students. Nelly, a 58-year-old nurse, first thought: "he's lost." She's heard stories about people who'd gone crazy after consuming cannabis; it turned them into criminals, or ruined their lives and the lives of those around them. But seeing the shame, apathy, and fear with which her son crossed the threshold of the front door changed her mind within seconds.

  • Uruguay Registers Marijuana Growers

    The long process of legalizing marijuana production in Uruguay continues to inch forward, under the watchful eye of other countries in the region considering similar measures.