Juarez Cartel News

Mexico’s Violent Juarez Cartel Capo, Almost a King, Now a Prisoner

Mexico’s Violent Juarez Cartel Capo, Almost a King, Now a Prisoner

Authorities in Mexico have captured the legendary Juarez Cartel leader Vicente Carrillo Fuentes, alias "Viceroy," who may be best remembered for presiding over the city of Juarez during what was arguably the most incredible spike in urban violence in the country's history. Read More

Juarez Cartel Profile

Juarez Cartel

Juarez Cartel

The Juarez Cartel is responsible for smuggling tons of narcotics from Mexico into the U.S. throughout its long and turbulent history, and the group’s intense rivalry with the Sinaloa Cartel helped turn Juarez into one of the most violent places in the world. 

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More Juarez Cartel News

  • Mexico’s Violent Juarez Cartel Capo, Almost a King, Now a Prisoner

    Authorities in Mexico have captured the legendary Juarez Cartel leader Vicente Carrillo Fuentes, alias "Viceroy," who may be best remembered for presiding over the city of Juarez during what was arguably the most incredible spike in urban violence in the country's history.

  • Reported Narco-Summit Could Herald Upheaval for Mexico Underworld

    The leaders of some of Mexico's principal drug cartels recently staged a narco-summit to reconfigure the criminal landscape, according to reports in local media, which, if accurate, could mark the start of a new anti-Sinaloa Cartel criminal alliance.

  • Mexico’s Internally Displaced An Invisible Problem: Report

    Hundreds of thousands of people in Mexico have been internally displaced due to violence perpetrated by organized crime groups but the majority have yet to receive adequate assistance from Mexican authorities, who have largely turned a blind eye to the problem.

  • Did the US Help Sinaloa Cartel Win Turf War?

    A prominent news site has released information suggesting US officials allowed informants from Mexico's Sinaloa Cartel to continue trafficking drugs during a turf war with the Juarez Cartel, but did officials really aim to help the cartel gain the upper hand in the conflict?

  • Tales From Mexico's Embattled Media: Part II

    Northern Mexico is home to the three most dangerous states in the country for journalists to ply their trade in. The story of Jaime Gonzalez -- the first journalist killed during the term of President Enrique Peña Nieto -- shows that in this region, refusing to publish stories about organized crime can be as dangerous as doing so.

  • The Current State of Mexico's Many Drug Cartels

    It is tempting to separate Mexico's drug cartels into six hierarchical groups, each competing for trafficking turf. The reality, however, is that the Sinaloa Federation, the Gulf Cartel, the Tijuana Cartel, the Juarez Cartel, the Zetas and La Familia, not to mention several new offshoot organizations, are fluid, dynamic, for-profit syndicates that sometimes operate under the umbrella of what are effectively conglomerates but more often than not operate as independent, smaller-scale franchises.

  • 4 of Mexico's Cartels Operate in Panama: Officials

    Panama's intelligence sources have identified four major Mexican cartels operating in that country, another sign of the widening reach of Mexico's criminals across the region, and of Panama's importance as a regional depot for drug traffickers.

  • Alleged Juarez Cartel Leader Arrested in Mexico

    Police in Mexico have arrested the alleged leader of the Juarez Cartel, who is also the brother of the cartel's late founder, raising the question of what will happen to the already battered organization.

  • Is Violence Returning to Ciudad Juarez?

    The drop in violence in Ciudad Juarez remains one of the most dramatic turnarounds of Mexico’s drug war, but a recent rise in killings raises questions about the durability of the gains.

  • Private Juarez: a Border Town's Security Revolution

    In 2010 Ciudad Juarez was one of the most violent and dangerous cities in the world, a frontline battleground in the "War on Drugs." Then, in 2011, the crime rate began to fall sharply—and kept falling. Today, the city has morphed back into a lively border city with bustling markets and active nightlife. The Juarez Metropolitan Police take the credit, but in fact, much of the credit should go to the 177 private security companies who guard stores, patrol the streets and serve as personal bodyguards.