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Criminal Groups Benefit from Mexico's Crackdown on Migrants

Criminal Groups Benefit from Mexico's Crackdown on Migrants

Criminal groups and corrupt officials are the main beneficiaries of a US inspired shift in Mexico's policy that is endangering migrants, according to a new report, and the recent US decision to allow more Central American immigrants refugee status will do little to protect them from abuse south of the Rio Grande.

2016 Seizures Suggest CentAm Still Top Drug Corridor to US

2016 Seizures Suggest CentAm Still Top Drug Corridor to US

Panama and Guatemala have seen a sizeable increase in drug seizures through the first half of 2016, an indication of Central America's persistent importance as a trafficking route to the United States despite past predictions of an impending shift towards the Caribbean.

Mexico Pursues Top Drug Lords Amid Fragmented Criminal Landscape

Mexico Pursues Top Drug Lords Amid Fragmented Criminal Landscape

Authorities in Mexico continue to focus on hunting down the heads of the country's most prominent cartels, pursuing a kingpin strategy that will probably do little to cure a dire security situation given the the nation's increasingly fragmented organized crime landscape.

Reporter Murdered in Veracruz, Mexico Was Under Police Protection

Reporter Murdered in Veracruz, Mexico Was Under Police Protection

The third reporter murdered in the southern Mexico state of Veracruz this year was gunned down in front of his family despite being under police protection at the time, illustrating the dangers of working as a journalist in a hub for drug and human trafficking that is plagued by corruption-fueled violence.

The Murder of Guatemala’s Prison ‘King’ Byron Lima: A 'Self-Coup d’etat'? (Part III)

The Murder of Guatemala’s Prison ‘King’ Byron Lima: A 'Self-Coup d’etat'? (Part III)

Shortly after Otto Pérez Molina was elected president of Guatemala, Byron Lima Oliva, the once-decorated former army captain, jailed for the murder of a bishop, sat down to write an email to the newly named minister of Interior, Mauricio López Bonilla.

The Zetas, Mexico’s most feared and violent criminal organization, have moved operations to Guatemala, penetrating local police forces and the military. They have made alliances with locals that permit them to launder their proceeds through agribusiness and public works contracts. They have also introduced a new way of operating. Beyond controlling the distribution chains and infrastructure needed to run the day-to-day operations, the Zetas are focused on controlling territory. In this they are the experts, creating a ruthless and intimidating force that is willing to take the fight to a new, often macabre level.