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As US Prosecutes Foreign Crimes, How Far Can Its Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Reach?

As US Prosecutes Foreign Crimes, How Far Can Its Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Reach?

The sentencing of a Zetas cartel assassin in Texas is the latest example of US prosecutors applying extraterritorial jurisdiction to foreign nationals for crimes they committed abroad, and which on the surface do not directly affect the United States. But what are the limitations to the application of this powerful legal tool?

Guatemala Authorities Reveal New Details in Byron Lima Murder Case

Guatemala Authorities Reveal New Details in Byron Lima Murder Case

Authorities in Guatemala have made several arrests and revealed previously-unknown details regarding the slaying of Byron Lima, the one-time "king" of the country's prisons. The new revelations suggest that there may have been more than one motive for the murder.

Crime Groups 'Persist' in Guatemala's Customs System: Defense Minister

Crime Groups 'Persist' in Guatemala's Customs System: Defense Minister

Guatemala's Defense Minister has denounced that criminal groups continue to infiltrate the country's customs system, suggesting that deeper structural reforms are needed to combat corruption within this institution.

Guatemala Investigates Another Top Official of Pérez Molina Govt

Guatemala Investigates Another Top Official of Pérez Molina Govt

A former presidential candidate, who was also a minister during the administration of jailed former Guatemalan President Otto Pérez Molina, has been accused of running a corruption and money laundering network, revealing another chapter in the story of Guatemala's mafia state.

After Lula's Conviction, A Typology of Presidential Corruption

After Lula's Conviction, A Typology of Presidential Corruption

On the surface, former Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva's 9-year sentence for corruption seems reminiscent of numerous corruption cases targeting former or current presidents in Latin America. But behind the accusations are varying degrees of collusion and control, from heading a criminal enterprise to a one-off criminal act of personal enrichment.

The Zetas, Mexico’s most feared and violent criminal organization, have moved operations to Guatemala, penetrating local police forces and the military. They have made alliances with locals that permit them to launder their proceeds through agribusiness and public works contracts. They have also introduced a new way of operating. Beyond controlling the distribution chains and infrastructure needed to run the day-to-day operations, the Zetas are focused on controlling territory. In this they are the experts, creating a ruthless and intimidating force that is willing to take the fight to a new, often macabre level.