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Guatemala’s CICIG Says More Big Corruption Cases to Come

Guatemala’s CICIG Says More Big Corruption Cases to Come

The commissioner of Guatemala's internationally backed anti-impunity body said that authorities expect to uncover government corruption schemes on the same scale as the ones that sent shock waves throughout the Central American nation last year. 

Northern Triangle Deploys Tri-National Force to Combat Gangs

Northern Triangle Deploys Tri-National Force to Combat Gangs

The Northern Triangle countries of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras will launch a tri-national force aimed at disrupting the movements of street gangs that are increasingly crossing borders in order to coordinate criminal activities and flee security crackdowns. 

Guatemala Activist Says Criminal Structures Remain Embedded in Govt

Guatemala Activist Says Criminal Structures Remain Embedded in Govt

In this article, Guatemalan activist Helen Mack discusses the potential reorganization of criminal networks within the government, comments on the role of the private sector and the public to combat corruption, and explains the active role of the US Embassy.

Extradition of 'Ghost' to US Could Haunt Guatemala Elites

Extradition of 'Ghost' to US Could Haunt Guatemala Elites

Guatemala has extradited to the United States an alleged drug trafficker suspected of being at the center of several developing scandals linked to the administration of President Jimmy Morales and that of his disgraced predecessor, Otto Pérez Molina. 

Did Front Man for Fugitive Mexico Governor Acquire Millions in US Assets?

Did Front Man for Fugitive Mexico Governor Acquire Millions in US Assets?

An alleged front man for fugitive Veracruz Gov. Javier Duarte has acquired a string of properties in a suburb of Houston, Texas, offering a further demonstration of the importance of the United States in laundering the proceeds of criminal activity in Mexico.

The Zetas, Mexico’s most feared and violent criminal organization, have moved operations to Guatemala, penetrating local police forces and the military. They have made alliances with locals that permit them to launder their proceeds through agribusiness and public works contracts. They have also introduced a new way of operating. Beyond controlling the distribution chains and infrastructure needed to run the day-to-day operations, the Zetas are focused on controlling territory. In this they are the experts, creating a ruthless and intimidating force that is willing to take the fight to a new, often macabre level.