Texis Cartel News

Did Narco-Linked El Salvador Congressman Plan Hit on Top Prosecutor?

Did Narco-Linked El Salvador Congressman Plan Hit on Top Prosecutor?

El Salvador's attorney general has accused a congressman of plotting his murder, adding a new twist to an ongoing case that has exposed alleged close ties between the legislator and a major drug trafficking network. Read More

Texis Cartel Profile

Texis Cartel

Texis Cartel

Unlike some Central American gangs that have earned fame for their brutality and their liberal use of violence, the Cartel de Texis has developed a reputation for a more business-like approach to the drug trade. But as the report by Salvadoran news site El Faro about the group illustrates, while the gang isn’t known for leaving a trail of dead behind, it has nonetheless turned itself into one of the more formidable criminal groups in El Salvador, and a vital link for Colombians and Mexicans seeking to move cocaine through the tiny nation.

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More Texis Cartel News

  • Did Narco-Linked El Salvador Congressman Plan Hit on Top Prosecutor?

    El Salvador's attorney general has accused a congressman of plotting his murder, adding a new twist to an ongoing case that has exposed alleged close ties between the legislator and a major drug trafficking network.

  • Alleged Salvadoran Kingpin 'Chepe Diablo' Clears Tax Debt

    Alleged Texis Cartel founder "Chepe Diablo" has nearly completed paying off his tax evasion debt to the government, and there is still no sign that the Salvadoran government intends to bring drug charges against the US-designated kingpin.

  • US Federal Agents Go After Texis Cartel Leader ‘Chepe Diablo’

    US investigators are looking into the bank transactions and the origin of the finances of "Chepe Diablo," who was placed on the country's kingpin list earlier this year. He has important shares in grain importation businesses, hotels and a construction company in El Salvador, writes Salvadoran journalist Hector Silva. What might they dig up on the alleged Texis Cartel leader?

  • Key El Salvador Gang-Underworld Player May Go Free

    One of El Salvador's most notorious underworld figures and a key link between the MS13 gang and drug traffickers is set to walk free in a blow to efforts to end the impunity that surrounds the country's most powerful criminals.

  • How a Good Soccer Team Gives Criminals Space to Operate

    Local soccer teams give criminal groups in the Northern Triangle countries of Central America the ability to launder proceeds, evade taxes, and accumulate enough political and social capital to avoid scrutiny.

  • US Turns Sights on Evasive El Salvador Cartel Leader

    The US has added prominent El Salvador businessman and Texis Cartel founder "Chepe Diablo" to its "Kingpin List," a move that may further erode the aura of immunity that until recently surrounded the powerful drug trafficking and money laundering organization.

  • El Salvador Moves Against Texis Cartel's Once Untouchable Leaders

    El Salvador's attorney general is taking the Al Capone route to nailing the Texis Cartel by charging the drug trafficking and money laundering group's principal leaders with tax evasion, in the latest attempt to end the impunity they have enjoyed until now. 

  • El Salvador Confession Reveals Drug Kingpin's Fruit Vendor Origins

    El Salvador authorities disclosed new details about the rise of a drug boss accused of moving 10 tons of cocaine into the United States, in a case highlighting the growing role of "free agent" traffickers in Central America's underworld.

  • El Salvador Tax Probe Tightens Noose Around Texis Cartel Leader

    As part of a tax evasion investigation, El Salvador prosecutors have seized documents and searched properties belonging to Texis Cartel leader "El Chepe Diablo" and two key business partners, in a sign that the elusive cartel kingpin may yet fall for financial crimes.

  • Bust Highlights El Salvador, Guatemala Criminal Cooperation

    Authorities in Central America have dismantled a drug trafficking organization the stretched between Guatemala and El Salvador and was responsible for drugs that entered schools and a prison, with the investigation revealing a network of disparate criminal elements with women in prominent roles.