Barrio 18 News

Barrio 18 Wants to Join Possible Talks with El Salvador Govt: Report

Barrio 18 Wants to Join Possible Talks with El Salvador Govt: Report

A second major gang in El Salvador said it hopes to join possible negotiations between the government and the MS13, but its entry into the process may only complicate efforts.

Barrio 18 Profile

Barrio 18

Barrio 18

The 18th Street Gang, also known as "Barrio 18," is one of the largest youth gangs in the Western Hemisphere. Like its better known rival, the Mara Salvatrucha (MS13), the Barrio 18 has cells operating from Central America to Canada, including the United States. With thousands of members across hundreds of kilometers, and interests in a number of different illicit activities, Barrio 18 is one of the more significant emerging criminal threats in the region. Still, it is questionable how far its different units are coordinated across borders, or even within the same city.

More Barrio 18 News

  • Barrio 18 Wants to Join Possible Talks with El Salvador Govt: Report

    Graffiti of the Sureños gang

    A second major gang in El Salvador said it hopes to join possible negotiations between the government and the MS13, but its entry into the process may only complicate efforts.

  • El Salvador Church Offers to Mediate Resolution with Gangs

    Bishop Gregorio Rosa Chávez

    In a first, top representatives of El Salvador's powerful and influential Catholic Church have said the Church would be willing to serve as a mediator in an eventual dialogue between the government and the country's gangs.

  • GameChangers 2016: El Salvador's New (Ideology Free) Civil War

    El Salvador's gangs and security forces are locked in low-intensity warfare

    The already heated fight between El Salvador's gangs and security forces began to resemble a low-intensity conflict in 2016, as the MS13 and Barrio 18 increasingly aligned against a government bent on destroying them in a battle that seemed to have everything you would expect in war except an ideology. 

  • GameChangers 2016: Elites, Organized Crime and Political Firestorms

    President Dilma Rousseff was removed from obvious amid a widening corruption scandal

    Welcome to InSight Crime's GameChangers 2016, where we highlight the most important trends in organized crime in the Americas. This year we put a spotlight on crime and corruption among the region's political elites, while reporting on government struggles to corral criminality fueled by street gangs, drug cartels and Marxist rebels alike.

  • El Salvador Police Prepare to Take Their Own Revenge Against Gangs

    Police officers outside a funeral for a slain colleague

    The same day they buried the seventh police officer killed by gang members in November, the government announced a new response plan, "Nemesis," which means revenge. This plan stems from measures that have already been implemented and promises very little. However, before the government's new commitment, police have said they are taking their own measures; some of them have decided to flee, others have chosen to create cells across the country to kill gang members and their families. The authorities have denied this on camera and declare that it is "speculation."

  • Report Says El Salvador Gangs Have Created a Parallel State

    An MS13 graffiti being painted over by an official in El Salvador

    A new study argues that powerful street gangs have gone a long way toward creating a parallel state in El Salvador, providing a helpful framework to illustrate the extent to which the gangs impact society and undermine state governance.

  • The El Salvador Businessman Who Does Not Pay the Gangs

    Catalino Mirando, owner of Acostes bus company, poses with his 9 mm pistol in his office.

    El Salvador's main passenger transport entrepreneur dares to resist paying extortion to the country's gangs. Catalino Miranda already knows that the police and prosecution services will not solve the problem, and he has chosen to arm his company and hire former military personnel for security. Most transport entrepreneurs, buses and minibuses pay "aguinaldo" (extortion fees) to gangs, but Catalino refuses to do so even though it has cost, according to him, a couple of dozen of his employees.

  • The Bus Route That Institutionalized Extortion in El Salvador

    Extortion payments are deducted from some bus drivers' salaries

    In El Salvador, extortion demanded by gangs has become so normalized that there is a bus company that deducts the cost of extortion directly from drivers' payroll in order to make an annual payment to the Barrio 18. The drivers understand it: refusing to pay is equivalent to death and reporting the extortion, in a lawless state that has lost all territorial control, would do very little.

  • El Salvador's FMLN: Talking Peace While Waging War

    El Salvador President Salvador Sánchez Cerén

    A series of videos showing officials from President Salvador Sánchez Cerén's administration holding secret negotiations with the country's principal street gangs prior to taking power have called into question the ruling FMLN's motives for talking to the gangs in the first place. Were they seeking an end to the gang wars or was it a way to prepare what has become a massive government offensive against them?

  • New El Salvador Gang Strategy Targets Public Officials: Report

    El Salvador's gangs have reportedly made a joint pact to attack the government

    El Salvador's three main gangs have reportedly joined forces to carry out strategic assassinations against public officials, which if true would mark a troubling development in the gangs' conflict with the state.

Investigations

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