Oficina de Envigado News

Is Mexico's Sinaloa Cartel Meeting with Medellin Gangs?

Is Mexico's Sinaloa Cartel Meeting with Medellin Gangs?

The director of an NGO in Colombia has reported that Mexico's Sinaloa Cartel recently met with gangs in Medellin to offer them material support in exchange for allegiance, but it is unlikely the cartel is heavily involved with the city's street gangs.  Read More

Oficina de Envigado Profile

Oficina de Envigado

Oficina de Envigado

The inheritors of Pablo Escobar’s drug trafficking empire in Colombia, the Oficina de Envigado is now a hodgepodge of smaller organizations that seeks alliances with street gangs to keep control of their territory and businesses that is in nearly constant flux. The Oficina de Envigado first arose as a faction of assassins established by Pablo Escobar in Envigado, a small municipality adjacent to Medellin, in the 1980s. Since then, the Oficina has evolved into a sizable, though conflicted, drug-running operation, drawing many of its leaders from former paramilitary blocs, while its lower ranks are filled with an endless pool of willing young men from the working-class neighborhoods of Medellin.

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More Oficina de Envigado News

  • Is Mexico's Sinaloa Cartel Meeting with Medellin Gangs?

    The director of an NGO in Colombia has reported that Mexico's Sinaloa Cartel recently met with gangs in Medellin to offer them material support in exchange for allegiance, but it is unlikely the cartel is heavily involved with the city's street gangs. 

  • US Blacklisting Shows Influence of Colombia's Oficina de Envigado

    Eight members of the Oficina de Envigado -- the heirs to Colombia's famed Medellin Cartel -- have been placed on the US Treasury's drug trafficking blacklist, showing that the group remains a powerful force in the international drug trade.

  • Is the Sinaloa Cartel now a Player in Medellin?

    A mafia boss is found slumped in a car park in an exclusive neighborhood with four bullets in his head. Grenade attacks and hitmen on motorbikes leave a trail of dead downtown. Colombia's most fearsome criminal organization plays peacemaker to warring street gangs, while Mexico's leading drug cartel floods the city with money and guns. 

  • Who Really Killed Pablo Escobar?

    Extradited Colombia paramilitary leader and mafia boss Diego Fernando Murillo, alias "Don Berna," has claimed his brother fired the shot that killed infamous drug lord Pablo Escobar, adding a new twist to rumors that have been circulating for years about Escobar's death. 

  • Another Colombia Mafia Boss Arrested in Spain

    A Medellin mafia boss and enforcer has been arrested in Spain, where he was allegedly running drug trafficking networks moving cocaine from Colombia to Europe.

  • US Puts Colombia’s Oficina de Envigado on Kingpin List Despite Decline

    US authorities have placed Colombia's Oficina de Envigado on its Specially Designated Narcotics Traffickers list in spite of the group's decline in recent years, in what appears to be a recognition of the organization's role in providing secondary services for major drug trafficking groups and potential for expansion.    

  • Is the Medellin Criminal Truce Fracturing in Colombia?

    Drug hits and gang shootouts are fueling fears the criminal pact that has lowered violence in Colombia's second city, Medellin, to historic levels could be expiring.

  • The Last BACRIM Standing: The Urabeños Today

    "Kiko" Gomez, a politician arrested for BACRIM ties

    Today the Urabeños are the only BACRIM with a national reach. They are also arguably the only real BACRIM still standing. While the government recognizes the existence of three BACRIM -- the Urabeños, the Rastrojos and the ERPAC dissidents -- the truth is that the Rastrojos are now fragmented into different factions, with no united leadership, while the most powerful of the ERPAC dissident groups, "Heroes of Vichada," is working with the Urabeños.

  • Urabeños Claim Responsibility for Drop in Medellin Murders

    Colombia's most prominent criminal organization, the Urabeños, have publically claimed responsibility for a major decline in murders in Medellin in 2013, challenging city authorities' claims that security forces are behind the decrease.

  • 20 Years After Pablo: The Evolution of Colombia's Drug Trade

    Twenty years ago, on December 2, 1993, Pablo Escobar, the pioneer of Colombia's cocaine trade, was killed on a rooftop in his native Medellin by police. His death signaled the end of one era of drug trafficking and the birth of another, as the drug trade continued apace, with Medellin still at its heart.