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Colombia Convicts Former Paramilitary Leaders for Hundreds of Crimes

Colombia Convicts Former Paramilitary Leaders for Hundreds of Crimes

Dozens of individuals in Colombia have been sentenced for crimes committed while serving under the banner of demobilized paramilitary groups, illustrating how peace agreements with armed actors are capable of meting out justice, albeit after long and complicated processes.

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The United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia - AUC) was a coalition of right-wing death squads that used the conflict to camouflage their illicit economic activities. These included drug trafficking, displacement, kidnapping, and extortion. The AUC once operated in two-thirds of the country with approximately 30,000 soldiers.

More AUC News

  • Colombia Convicts Former Paramilitary Leaders for Hundreds of Crimes

    A total of 32 former paramilitary chiefs were condemned

    Dozens of individuals in Colombia have been sentenced for crimes committed while serving under the banner of demobilized paramilitary groups, illustrating how peace agreements with armed actors are capable of meting out justice, albeit after long and complicated processes.

  • What's in a Name? The Politics of Latin America's Organized Crime Lexicon

    Colombian soldiers are permitted to combat GAO

    Arguing about artificial labels that help make sense of organized crime in Latin America may seem trivial. After all, the reality lurking beneath these labels -- bodies riddled with bullets, bank accounts stuffed with cash, and enough cocaine to sink a submarine -- is so tangible, so immediate for the people wrapped up in its unceasing vortex. But the terms and phrases used about by governments and news outlets carry their own type of power. They help shape public opinion, domestic security policies, and the legal limitations of international actors. As organized crime in the region adapts to new realities on the ground, it's imperative that our lexicon for it does so as well.

  • Colombia Braces for Impact of Returning Drug Traffickers and Paramilitaries

    Hector Restrepo, alias "Perra loca"

    The release of Colombian underworld boss "Perra loca" from a US prison is adding to fears that a flood of recently freed drug lords and paramilitaries could have a violent impact on the country's already volatile criminal landscape.

  • Colombia's Mirror: War and Drug Trafficking in the Prison System

    Colombia's prisons are a reflection of the multiple conflicts that have plagued the country for the last half-century. Paramilitaries, guerrillas and drug trafficking groups have vied for control of the jails where they can continue to manage their operations on the outside. Instead of corralling these forces, prison authorities have joined them, while multiple government efforts to reform the system have failed.   

  • Intl Court Condemns Colombia for Bloody 2002 Military Operation

    Paramilitary fighter working with Colombian army troops in Operation Orion, 2002

    An international court's condemnation of the Colombian state's role in an infamous military operation in the city of Medellín speaks to the failings of militarizing the fight against illegal armed groups, particularly in heavily populated urban areas.

  • How Rejected FARC Peace Deal Compares to Earlier Paramilitary Pact

    Colombia's peace agreement was narrowly rejected in a plebiscite

    Following the narrow victory by those who opposed the peace deal between Colombia's government and the FARC rebel group, InSight Crime considers how it compares to the transitional justice agreement struck a decade earlier with right-wing paramilitaries.

  • Colombia Elites and Organized Crime: 'Don Berna'

    By the end of 1993, Pablo Escobar was cornered. The cocaine king -- known as "El Patrón" -- was running out of money and options. His top assassins were either dead or had turned themselves in. Almost all of the senior members of the Medellín Cartel were either in prison, or had gone over to his rivals, a shadowy paramilitary group that called itself People Persecuted by Pablo Escobar (Perseguidos por Pablo Escobar - PEPES). Leading the hunt against him for the PEPES was one-legged former guerrilla and cartel enforcer Diego Murillo Bejarano, alias "Don Berna." Berna had turned on Escobar after El Patrón killed his boss, Fernando Galeano. As part of the plan to destroy Escobar, he and the PEPES had teamed up with the Colombian police's famed Search Bloc.

  • Colombia Elites and Organized Crime: 'Jorge 40'

    Rodrigo Tovar Pupo, alias 'Jorge 40' (Getty Images)

    Rodrigo Tovar Pupo never imagined it would come to this: dressed in an orange jumpsuit in a Washington DC courtroom and standing in front of a United States federal judge, the grandson of a wealthy Colombian cattle rancher and nephew to a governor was facing a possible 30-year jail sentence for drug trafficking. In his own mind, Tovar was a hero, not a drug trafficker -- a warrior, not a criminal.

  • Court Ruling Stirs Controversy Over Colombia's 'Para-Economy'

    A court ruling that mentioned Postobón sparked controversy.

    A recent ruling by Colombia’s Justice and Peace Court that mentioned Postobón called for employees of the iconic soft drink company to be investigated for possible past collaboration with a paramilitary group but did not explicitly implicate the company itself, court documents show.

  • Colombia Investigates Over 100 Disappearances from Bogotá Prison

    Modelo Prison, Bogota, Colombia

    Prosecutors in Colombia believe over 100 people were murdered, dismembered and disappeared in a Bogotá prison between 1999 and 2001, in a macabre example of how armed groups and drug traffickers turned Colombian prisons into hubs of organized crime.

Investigations

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Trafficking Firearms Into Honduras

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InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Murder

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Trafficking Firearms in Honduras

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The weapons trade within Honduras is difficult to monitor. This is largely because the military, the country's sole importer, and the Armory, the sole salesmen of weapons, do not release information to the public. The lack of transparency extends to private security companies, which do not have...

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Money

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