Zetas News

As US Prosecutes Foreign Crimes, How Far Can Its Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Reach?

As US Prosecutes Foreign Crimes, How Far Can Its Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Reach?

The sentencing of a Zetas cartel assassin in Texas is the latest example of US prosecutors applying extraterritorial jurisdiction to foreign nationals for crimes they committed abroad, and which on the surface do not directly affect the United States. But what are the limitations to the application of this powerful legal tool?

Zetas Profile

Zetas

Zetas

Beginning as a group of Special Forces deserters at the service of the Gulf Cartel, the Zetas would go on to become one of the most powerful and feared cartels in Mexico before infighting and the loss of leaders began their decline.

More Zetas News

  • Mexican Military Kills 25 Suspected 'Zetas'

    The Mexican military announced it had killed 25 suspected members of the Zetas criminal organization in the municipality of Treviño, Tamaulipas, while they rescued three kidnap victims from a farm, according to an Associated Press report.
  • More Kidnappings of Migrants

    Authorities reported several more kidnappings of migrants in Mexico, including a case in Tijuana where 17 migrants continue missing, La Hora newspaper reports. Other cases stretched from Cuncún to the border with Guatemala.
  • 'Zetas Control Human Trafficking in Hidalgo'

    A report in Milenio describes how the Zetas control the human trafficking trade in the central state of Hidalgo, where an estimated 500,000 migrants (mostly Central American) pass each year.
  • Guatemalans Working with Zetas Sentenced

    Six Guatemalan former military were sentenced to prison this week in Mexico for working with the Mexican criminal group the Zetas, Prensa Libre says.

  • 20,000 Migrants Kidnapped per year in Mexico

    Twenty thousand migrants per year are kidnapped in Mexico by criminal groups, ElSalvador.com says, citing Mexican and international monitoring organizations. The startling number appears just days after 72 migrants were found shot and killed execution style in the Tamaulipas state in northern Mexico. Many of these migrants ride the so-called “train of death” to reach the border. As this CNN report makes clear, it is a treacherous trip.
  • Heriberto Lazcano, alias 'Z3'

    Heriberto Lazcano, alias "Z3"

    Heriberto Lazcano, alias "Z3," was a former commander in the Mexican special forces, before going on to head the Zetas’ drug trafficking operations. He was killed in a shootout with Mexican marines in October 2012.

  • Miguel Angel Treviño, alias 'Z40'

    Z40

    Miguel Angel Treviño, alias "Z40," was a top commander of the Zetas criminal organization in Mexico before his capture by Mexican Marines on July 15, 2013. 

  • 17 Dead in Honduras Gang Massacre

    Honduras is seeing the fallout from Tuesday’s grisly massacre inside a shoe factory, when three perpetrators used AK-47s to slaughter 17 people.

  • Zetas

    The Zetas, once the military wing of the Gulf Cartel, are among one of the most violent groups in Mexico, with a growing presence in neighboring Guatemala. The Zetas started out as an enforcer gang for the Gulf Cartel, taking their name from the radio code used for senior officers in the Mexican army. Not only are they highly organized, but their use of brutality and shock tactics -- petrol bombs, beheadings, and roadblocks -- has led the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to describe them as perhaps “the most technologically advanced, sophisticated and violent of these paramilitary enforcement groups." However, a series of arrests and killings of their top leaders, and a rumored split within the group, have left them weaker than before.

Investigations

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Counting Firearms in Honduras

Counting Firearms in Honduras

Estimates vary widely as to how many legal and illegal weapons are circulating in Honduras. There are many reasons for this. The government does not have a centralized database that tracks arms seizures, purchases, sales and other matters concerning arms possession, availability and merchandising. The laws surrounding...

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Power

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Power

  The Bajo Cauca Franchise BACRIM-Land Armed Power Dynamics The BACRIM in places like the region of Bajo Cauca are a typical manifestation of Colombia's underworld today: a semi-autonomous local cell that is part of a powerful national network.

Trafficking Firearms in Honduras

Trafficking Firearms in Honduras

The weapons trade within Honduras is difficult to monitor. This is largely because the military, the country's sole importer, and the Armory, the sole salesmen of weapons, do not release information to the public. The lack of transparency extends to private security companies, which do not have...

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Murder

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Murder

  Life of a Sicario Anatomy of a Hit   The BACRIM's control over territories such as the north Colombian region of Bajo Cauca comes at the point of a gun, and death is a constant price of their power.

Trafficking Firearms Into Honduras

Trafficking Firearms Into Honduras

Honduras does not produce weapons,[1] but weapons are trafficked into the country in numerous ways. These vary depending on weapon availability in neighboring countries, demand in Honduras, government controls and other factors. They do not appear to obey a single strategic logic, other than that of evading...

Homicides in Guatemala: Introduction, Methodology, and Major Findings

Homicides in Guatemala: Introduction, Methodology, and Major Findings

When violence surged in early 2015 in Guatemala, then-President Otto Pérez Molina knew how to handle the situation: Blame the street gangs. 

Nariño, Colombia: Ground Zero of the Cocaine Trade

Nariño, Colombia: Ground Zero of the Cocaine Trade

The department of Nariño in southwest Colombia is the main coca-producing area in the country and in the world. It is a place scarred by poverty and years of armed conflict between guerrillas, the state and paramilitary groups. Perhaps nowhere else in the country are the challenges...

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Money

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Money

  Drugs Extortion Criminal Cash Flows Millions of dollars in dirty money circulate constantly around Bajo Cauca, flowing upwards and outwards from a broad range of criminal activities. The BACRIM are the chief regulators and beneficiaries of this shadow economy.

Closing the Gaps on Firearms Trafficking in Honduras

Closing the Gaps on Firearms Trafficking in Honduras

As set out in this report, the legal structure around Honduras' arms trade is deeply flawed. The legislation is inconsistent and unclear as to the roles of different institutions, while the regulatory system is insufficiently funded, anachronistic and administered by officials who are overworked or susceptible to...