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Zetas News

Zetas-Gulf Cartel Conflict Continues to Rock Mexico's Northeast

Zetas-Gulf Cartel Conflict Continues to Rock Mexico's Northeast

The ongoing decline of the Gulf Cartel and the Zetas has left northeastern Mexico without a single dominant criminal force. But the crime groups' longstanding rivalry has continued to see blood spilled in the key trafficking region.

Zetas Profile

Zetas

Zetas

Beginning as a group of Special Forces deserters at the service of the Gulf Cartel, the Zetas would go on to become one of the most powerful and feared cartels in Mexico before infighting and the loss of leaders began their decline.

More Zetas News

  • Salvadoran Policeman Dies on Ranch controlled by 'Zetas' in Mexico

    After the July 24 death of a Salvadoran policeman on a ranch in Mexico along the US border that Mexican authorities say was controlled by the Zetas criminal syndicate, ElSalvador.com explores why Jesús Elías was there in the first place.

  • Arrested Farmers Deny Cartel Links

    Amidst confusing and suspicious circumstances, Mexican authorities say they have arrested eight members of the Peasant Farmer and Popular Organization.

  • Priest Accused of Accepting Zetas Money

    A priest in Pachuca, Hidalgo is under investigation by the Mexican Attorney General’s Office and Church authorities for his alleged connections with the drug trafficking organization known as the Zetas, Mexico's Noroeste newspaper reports.

  • Suspected Human Smugglers Found Dead

    Mexican authorities found three dead bodies of men they said were members of the group that killed 72 migrants in Tamaulipas last month, La Cronica reported. One of the witnesses, a Honduran migrant who escaped, identified the men. They were found along the side of the road near where the massacre happened after members of the Mexican Navy received an anonymous phone tip. The army killed three other alleged members of the gang that killed the migrants, and another was captured. The Zetas drug trafficking organization are said to be responsible for the massacre. The gang has branched into human trafficking in recent years, which the United Nations estimates is a $7 billion per year business.
  • Mexican Military Kills 25 Suspected 'Zetas'

    The Mexican military announced it had killed 25 suspected members of the Zetas criminal organization in the municipality of Treviño, Tamaulipas, while they rescued three kidnap victims from a farm, according to an Associated Press report.
  • More Kidnappings of Migrants

    Authorities reported several more kidnappings of migrants in Mexico, including a case in Tijuana where 17 migrants continue missing, La Hora newspaper reports. Other cases stretched from Cuncún to the border with Guatemala.
  • 'Zetas Control Human Trafficking in Hidalgo'

    A report in Milenio describes how the Zetas control the human trafficking trade in the central state of Hidalgo, where an estimated 500,000 migrants (mostly Central American) pass each year.
  • Guatemalans Working with Zetas Sentenced

    Six Guatemalan former military were sentenced to prison this week in Mexico for working with the Mexican criminal group the Zetas, Prensa Libre says.

  • 20,000 Migrants Kidnapped per year in Mexico

    Twenty thousand migrants per year are kidnapped in Mexico by criminal groups, ElSalvador.com says, citing Mexican and international monitoring organizations. The startling number appears just days after 72 migrants were found shot and killed execution style in the Tamaulipas state in northern Mexico. Many of these migrants ride the so-called “train of death” to reach the border. As this CNN report makes clear, it is a treacherous trip.
  • Heriberto Lazcano, alias 'Z3'

    Heriberto Lazcano, alias "Z3"

    Heriberto Lazcano, alias "Z3," was a former commander in the Mexican special forces, before going on to head the Zetas’ drug trafficking operations. He was killed in a shootout with Mexican marines in October 2012.

Investigations

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Trafficking Firearms Into Honduras

Trafficking Firearms Into Honduras

Honduras does not produce weapons,[1] but weapons are trafficked into the country in numerous ways. These vary depending on weapon availability in neighboring countries, demand in Honduras, government controls and other factors. They do not appear to obey a single strategic logic, other than that of evading...

Venezuela Prisons: 'Pranes' and 'Revolutionary' Criminality

Venezuela Prisons: 'Pranes' and 'Revolutionary' Criminality

In May 2011, a 26-year-old prison gang leader held 4,000 members of the Venezuelan security forces, backed by tanks and helicopters, at bay for weeks. Humiliated nationally and internationally, it pushed President Hugo Chávez into a different and disastrous approach to the prison system.

Closing the Gaps on Firearms Trafficking in Honduras

Closing the Gaps on Firearms Trafficking in Honduras

As set out in this report, the legal structure around Honduras' arms trade is deeply flawed. The legislation is inconsistent and unclear as to the roles of different institutions, while the regulatory system is insufficiently funded, anachronistic and administered by officials who are overworked or susceptible to...

Trafficking Firearms in Honduras

Trafficking Firearms in Honduras

The weapons trade within Honduras is difficult to monitor. This is largely because the military, the country's sole importer, and the Armory, the sole salesmen of weapons, do not release information to the public. The lack of transparency extends to private security companies, which do not have...

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Murder

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Murder

  Life of a Sicario Anatomy of a Hit   The BACRIM's control over territories such as the north Colombian region of Bajo Cauca comes at the point of a gun, and death is a constant price of their power.

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Power

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Power

  The Bajo Cauca Franchise BACRIM-Land Armed Power Dynamics The BACRIM in places like the region of Bajo Cauca are a typical manifestation of Colombia's underworld today: a semi-autonomous local cell that is part of a powerful national network.

Nariño, Colombia: Ground Zero of the Cocaine Trade

Nariño, Colombia: Ground Zero of the Cocaine Trade

The department of Nariño in southwest Colombia is the main coca-producing area in the country and in the world. It is a place scarred by poverty and years of armed conflict between guerrillas, the state and paramilitary groups. Perhaps nowhere else in the country are the challenges...

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Money

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Money

  Drugs Extortion Criminal Cash Flows Millions of dollars in dirty money circulate constantly around Bajo Cauca, flowing upwards and outwards from a broad range of criminal activities. The BACRIM are the chief regulators and beneficiaries of this shadow economy.

Counting Firearms in Honduras

Counting Firearms in Honduras

Estimates vary widely as to how many legal and illegal weapons are circulating in Honduras. There are many reasons for this. The government does not have a centralized database that tracks arms seizures, purchases, sales and other matters concerning arms possession, availability and merchandising. The laws surrounding...