Sinaloa Cartel News

Mexico Rehab Center Massacre Tied to Conflict Over Local Drug Trade

Mexico Rehab Center Massacre Tied to Conflict Over Local Drug Trade

Authorities have blamed conflict over local drug markets for a bloody massacre at a drug treatment center in Mexico, the latest example of violence fueled by Mexico's fragmented criminal landscape.

Sinaloa Cartel Profile

Sinaloa Cartel

Sinaloa Cartel

The Sinaloa Cartel, often described as the largest and most powerful drug trafficking organization in the Western Hemisphere, is an alliance of some of Mexico's top capos. The coalition's members operate in concert to protect themselves, relying on connections at the highest levels and corrupting portions of the federal police and military to maintain the upper hand against rivals.

More Sinaola Cartel News

  • Juan Jose Esparragoza Moreno, alias 'El Azul'

    A former police detective, Juan Jose Esparragoza Moreno, alias "El Azul," was the go-to facilitator for peace deals between rival cartels in Mexico. Among his colleagues in the Sinaloa Cartel, Esparragoza maintained the lowest profile. He reportedly died in June 2014 from a heart attack.

  • Joaquín Guzmán Loera, alias 'El Chapo'

    Mexican drug lord Joaquin Guzmán Loera, alias "El Chapo," heads up an alliance of powerful drug traffickers known as the Sinaloa Cartel. His ability to simultaneously co-opt public officials, attack enemies' strongholds, and find creative ways to get his drugs to market has made him a legend in the underworld.

  • Ismael Zambada Garcia, alias 'El Mayo'

    Ismael Zambada Garcia, alias "El Mayo," heads a faction of the Sinaloa Cartel. Along his recently escaped partner, Joaquin Guzman Loera, alias "El Chapo," El Mayo is one of the most storied traffickers in Mexico.

  • McClatchy: Marijuana Booming

    Mexico’s marijuana business is booming, according to a McClatchy report in the Miami Herald. The story says that production is up 35 percent and 32,000 tons of the drug were produced in 2009, still much smaller than U.S. production, which is closer to 76,000 tons. It adds that peasant farmers who grow the drug, mostly in the so-called Golden Triangle of Durango, Sinaloa and Chihuahua states, do not see much risk because the army manual eradicates it; or much profit (slightly more than corn), but that the drug is the traffickers’ “cash cow.”
  • 'Barbie' Talks?

    Mexican authorities are making it seem as if Edgar Valdez Villareal, alias “La Barbie,” is cooperating with them following their recent capture of the drug lord. The police released a video, seen here on El Universal’s website where the former top level security guard for Arturo Beltran Leyva, who tried to start his own organization following the death of his boss in December 2009, talks about his meetings Mexico’s most wanted traffickers, including Joaquin Guzman, alias “El Chapo.”

  • Alejandro Flores Cacho

    Alejandro Flores Cacho runs the air operations of the Sinaloa Cartel in Mexico. A mysterious figure, relatively little is known about Flores Cacho except that he has created an operation that includes training centers for pilots and money laundering operations for the cartel.

Investigations

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