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Mexico AG Resigns Amid Growing Pressure to Tackle Widespread Graft

Mexico AG Resigns Amid Growing Pressure to Tackle Widespread Graft

Mexico's top prosecutor has stepped down less than a year after taking office amid growing pressure to tackle widespread corruption. The resignation serves as another example of civil society's influence in fighting graft in the region, but it also raises questions about whether his successor can make a difference.

#BlackWednesday: Guatemala Takes Another Step to Institutionalize Corruption

#BlackWednesday: Guatemala Takes Another Step to Institutionalize Corruption

Guatemala's congress took another bold step towards institutionalizing corruption on September 13, by reforming a law to protect politicians and their party functionaries from prosecution and penalties in cases of illicit financing of political campaigns.

New Charges Provide Further Evidence of Crime Group Run by Brazil Elites

New Charges Provide Further Evidence of Crime Group Run by Brazil Elites

Brazil's top prosecutor has charged several former and current senators with receiving bribes and being part of a "criminal organization," offering further evidence suggesting that Brazil's elites were, at some level, operating as a criminal syndicate.

Was Brazil's Workers' Party a 'Criminal Organization'? (And Why It Matters)

Was Brazil's Workers' Party a 'Criminal Organization'? (And Why It Matters)

Brazil's chief prosecutor charged former presidents Luiz Inácio "Lula" da Silva and Dilma Rousseff with running a "criminal organization," marking a new attempt by judicial officials to prove that the former leaders' political party functioned more like a crime syndicate. But the accusations seem like a stretch and may establish a dangerous precedent for future prosecutions. 

Latin America Scores Poorly in New 'Global Impunity Index'

Latin America Scores Poorly in New 'Global Impunity Index'

Nearly every country in Latin America is struggling to combat high rates of impunity, according to a new report that analyzes structural and human rights conditions contributing to crimes going unpunished in the region.

In Central America's Northern Triangle, impunity can be won with money, contacts and coercion. And the same rules apply whether you're a high-level government official or a narco “kingpin.”