Guatemala Mayor ‘Tres Kiebres’: The Art of Being ‘3 Times Broken’

The atmosphere was light, almost jovial, as Ipala's Mayor Esduin Javier turned to the next item on the agenda. The issue was what the people at the municipality's monthly town hall called a "Boulevard." Boulevard was perhaps a strong word for most places, but in this town of 20,000, the 12-meter wide street with a natural barrier complete with palm trees more than qualified.

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The Allegory of El Salvador’s ‘Dany Boy’: MS13 Gang Leader, Activist, or Both?

Dany Balmore Romero García faces trial in El Salvador on charges of participating in gang activities and conspiring to commit murder. The case against him illustrates just how difficult it is to determine who is a gang member, and why it's so important.

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Firearms Trafficking in Honduras: Introduction and Major Findings

Honduras has one of the highest homicide rates in the world, and some 75 percent of these homicides are committed using guns.[1] The world average is closer to 50 percent. Honduras is not alone in Central America. Just over 60 percent of El Salvador's homicides and 81 percent of homicides in Guatemala -- Honduras' Northern Triangle neighbors -- involve firearms.[2]

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Venezuela Prisons: 'Pranes' and 'Revolutionary' Criminality

In May 2011, a 26-year-old prison gang leader held 4,000 members of the Venezuelan security forces, backed by tanks and helicopters, at bay for weeks. Humiliated nationally and internationally, it pushed President Hugo Chávez into a different and disastrous approach to the prison system.

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Counting Firearms in Honduras

Estimates vary widely as to how many legal and illegal weapons are circulating in Honduras. There are many reasons for this. The government does not have a centralized database that tracks arms seizures, purchases, sales and other matters concerning arms possession, availability and merchandising. The laws surrounding guns also have numerous contradictions and place an unfair burden on often powerless and resource-strapped institutions. Inefficiency bolsters the black market. Rather than going through what can be an arduous, bureaucratic process, Hondurans often opt to obtain weaponry and munitions illegally.

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