Honduras News

'Organized Crime Permeates Society' in Honduras: Presidential Advisor

'Organized Crime Permeates Society' in Honduras: Presidential Advisor

While Honduran drug traffickers testify in US courts about their ties with the country's political class, a presidential advisor in Honduras has no qualms about saying that the links between criminals and candidates encompass all political parties.

Honduras Profile

Honduras

Honduras

One of the poorest countries in Latin America, Honduras is now also the region's most violent and crime-ridden country. This is, in part, due to its role as a strategically important transit nation for the transnational drug trade, as well as macroeconomic shifts, endemic poverty, corruption, and political turmoil. Estimates vary, but between 140 and 300 tons of cocaine are believed to pass through the country each year.

More Honduras News

  • Honduras Police Respond to InSight Crime Firearms Trafficking Investigation

    The vast majority of murders in Honduras are committed with firearms

    As congress debates new legislation regarding firearms, authorities in Honduras have publicly responded to the recent publication of an InSight Crime investigation on firearms trafficking in the country, outlining some of the steps they are taking to improve their weapons control efforts.*

  • Former Honduras Investment Minister Admits to Laundering Drug Money

    Ex-Honduran Minister Yankel Rosenthal

    A former minister and member of one of the richest families in Honduras has pleaded guilty in a US court to laundering money for the once-powerful Cachiros drug trafficking group.

  • Weekly InSight: Special Investigation on Firearms Trafficking in Honduras

    Firearms are used in a large majority of murders in Honduras

    In our August 24 Facebook Live session, Co-director Steven Dudley and Senior Editor Mike LaSusa spoke about InSight Crime's new special investigation on firearms trafficking in Honduras.

  • Honduran Kingpin's Plea Agreement May Have Damning Consequences

    Atlantic Cartel leader Wilter Neptalí Blanco Ruíz

    InSight Crime has uncovered new details about a plea agreement between US federal prosecutors and Wilter Neptalí Blanco Ruíz, the alleged leader of one of Honduras' most notorious drug trafficking groups, raising questions about what information the fallen kingpin may provide to authorities.

  • Closing the Gaps on Firearms Trafficking in Honduras

    As set out in this report, the legal structure around Honduras' arms trade is deeply flawed. The legislation is inconsistent and unclear as to the roles of different institutions, while the regulatory system is insufficiently funded, anachronistic and administered by officials who are overworked or susceptible to corruption.

  • Trafficking Firearms in Honduras

    The weapons trade within Honduras is difficult to monitor. This is largely because the military, the country's sole importer, and the Armory, the sole salesmen of weapons, do not release information to the public. The lack of transparency extends to private security companies, which do not have to release information regarding their purchases and have been granted great leeway with regards to the weapons they can possess. As noted at the onset of this study, the police, who are tasked with registering weapons, have trouble keeping track of what they have confiscated. Police stockpiles are also vulnerable, as will be evident later in this report.

  • Honduras Convicts Trafficker 'Chepe Handal' on Second Set of Charges

    José Miguel Handal Pérez, alias “Chepe Handal"

    Honduras has convicted a major drug trafficker wanted for extradition by the United States in a second case against him, illustrating the country's resolve to improve the capacity of its judiciary.

  • Trafficking Firearms Into Honduras

    Honduras does not produce weapons,[1] but weapons are trafficked into the country in numerous ways. These vary depending on weapon availability in neighboring countries, demand in Honduras, government controls and other factors. They do not appear to obey a single strategic logic, other than that of evading detection, although many of them have a single origin.

  • Counting Firearms in Honduras

    Estimates vary widely as to how many legal and illegal weapons are circulating in Honduras. There are many reasons for this. The government does not have a centralized database that tracks arms seizures, purchases, sales and other matters concerning arms possession, availability and merchandising. The laws surrounding guns also have numerous contradictions and place an unfair burden on often powerless and resource-strapped institutions. Inefficiency bolsters the black market. Rather than going through what can be an arduous, bureaucratic process, Hondurans often opt to obtain weaponry and munitions illegally.

  • Firearms Trafficking in Honduras: Introduction and Major Findings

    Honduras has one of the highest homicide rates in the world, and some 75 percent of these homicides are committed using guns.[1] The world average is closer to 50 percent. Honduras is not alone in Central America. Just over 60 percent of El Salvador's homicides and 81 percent of homicides in Guatemala -- Honduras' Northern Triangle neighbors -- involve firearms.[2]

Investigations

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Closing the Gaps on Firearms Trafficking in Honduras

Closing the Gaps on Firearms Trafficking in Honduras

As set out in this report, the legal structure around Honduras' arms trade is deeply flawed. The legislation is inconsistent and unclear as to the roles of different institutions, while the regulatory system is insufficiently funded, anachronistic and administered by officials who are overworked or susceptible to...

Nariño, Colombia: Ground Zero of the Cocaine Trade

Nariño, Colombia: Ground Zero of the Cocaine Trade

The department of Nariño in southwest Colombia is the main coca-producing area in the country and in the world. It is a place scarred by poverty and years of armed conflict between guerrillas, the state and paramilitary groups. Perhaps nowhere else in the country are the challenges...

Trafficking Firearms in Honduras

Trafficking Firearms in Honduras

The weapons trade within Honduras is difficult to monitor. This is largely because the military, the country's sole importer, and the Armory, the sole salesmen of weapons, do not release information to the public. The lack of transparency extends to private security companies, which do not have...

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Murder

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Murder

  Life of a Sicario Anatomy of a Hit   The BACRIM's control over territories such as the north Colombian region of Bajo Cauca comes at the point of a gun, and death is a constant price of their power.

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Money

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Money

  Drugs Extortion Criminal Cash Flows Millions of dollars in dirty money circulate constantly around Bajo Cauca, flowing upwards and outwards from a broad range of criminal activities. The BACRIM are the chief regulators and beneficiaries of this shadow economy.

Counting Firearms in Honduras

Counting Firearms in Honduras

Estimates vary widely as to how many legal and illegal weapons are circulating in Honduras. There are many reasons for this. The government does not have a centralized database that tracks arms seizures, purchases, sales and other matters concerning arms possession, availability and merchandising. The laws surrounding...

Trafficking Firearms Into Honduras

Trafficking Firearms Into Honduras

Honduras does not produce weapons,[1] but weapons are trafficked into the country in numerous ways. These vary depending on weapon availability in neighboring countries, demand in Honduras, government controls and other factors. They do not appear to obey a single strategic logic, other than that of evading...

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Power

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Power

  The Bajo Cauca Franchise BACRIM-Land Armed Power Dynamics The BACRIM in places like the region of Bajo Cauca are a typical manifestation of Colombia's underworld today: a semi-autonomous local cell that is part of a powerful national network.

Venezuela Prisons: 'Pranes' and 'Revolutionary' Criminality

Venezuela Prisons: 'Pranes' and 'Revolutionary' Criminality

In May 2011, a 26-year-old prison gang leader held 4,000 members of the Venezuelan security forces, backed by tanks and helicopters, at bay for weeks. Humiliated nationally and internationally, it pushed President Hugo Chávez into a different and disastrous approach to the prison system.