FARC News

FARC Entrance to Colombia’s Political Arena Haunted by Guerrillas’ Past

FARC Entrance to Colombia’s Political Arena Haunted by Guerrillas’ Past

Colombia's demobilized FARC guerrilla group recently launched a new political party, but internal divisions have left the future of the new organization uncertain. 

FARC Profile

FARC

FARC

As the biggest irregular army in Colombia, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia - FARC) have long operated in various regions of the country in search of resources to fund their insurgency. They agreed to end their 52-year war against the government in August 2016, as part of a peace process that began in 2012. The FARC are the oldest and most important guerrilla group in the Western Hemisphere. They have long financed their political and military battle against the Colombian government through kidnapping, extortion and participating in the drug trade on various levels.

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  • FARC Entrance to Colombia’s Political Arena Haunted by Guerrillas’ Past

    The Common Alternative Revolutionary Force

    Colombia's demobilized FARC guerrilla group recently launched a new political party, but internal divisions have left the future of the new organization uncertain. 

  • Allegations of Venezuela, Nicaragua Complicity in FARC Money Laundering Resurface

    Is a Nicaraguan company laundering money for the FARC?

    Recent testimony before the US Senate revived allegations that a Venezuela-owned company in Nicaragua may have laundered money for Colombia's demobilizing FARC guerrillas, once again raising the question of whether foreign governments may have been complicit in washing the fighters' dirty cash.

  • Drug Capos Looking for Way Out Via Colombia Peace Accords

    Drug capos are trying to exploit the FARC peace accords

    Authorities in Colombia have filtered out more than two dozen drug capos attempting to pass themselves off as FARC guerrillas in order to take advantage of judicial benefits offered to demobilizing rebels under the terms of a 2016 peace agreement. The incident is another sign of the obstacles the country's thriving drug trade poses to the peace process.

  • The FARC's Riches: Up to $580 Million in Annual Income

    The FARC may have earned up to $580 million a year

    The former rebels of what was once Latin America's oldest insurgency, the FARC, continually claimed to have barely any money. And while they did have a lot of expenses, they also have traditionally sat astride territories that generate well over $1 billion dollars in criminal revenue every year. This last installment on the FARC's riches attempts to quantify the lucrative economies they used to control -- ones that Colombia's other criminal actors now wish to possess.

  • The FARC's Riches: Millions Apparently Lost to Dissidents

    Many of the FARC's assets have been lost to deserter groups

    Formerly the Western Hemisphere's largest guerrilla organization, Colombia's FARC has compiled a full inventory of their wealth following half a century of conflict and entrenchment in criminal activities. A front-by-front breakdown offers a remarkably detailed insight into the riches amassed by certain units and, perhaps more disturbingly, how much may be in the hands of increasingly powerful criminalized breakaways. Moreover, the inventory proves that the FARC leadership lacks full control over the group's vast wealth, raising questions over possibly undeclared assets, and making the former guerrillas more vulnerable to judicial prosecution as they shape their political future.

  • The FARC's Riches: List of Assets Fails to Reveal Guerrillas' Total Wealth

    The FARC have probably left many assets undeclared

    Colombia's demobilized FARC have finally revealed their official list of assets -- worth hundreds of millions of dollars -- but the country's top prosecutor has already lambasted the "useless" inventory, which likely comes up far short in its accounting of the former guerrillas' true riches.

  • Colombia's FARC Finalize Disarmament Today. What's Next?

    The FARC will now begin reintegrating into civilian life

    August 15 is the final day of the historic disarmament of Colombia's FARC rebels, paving the way for the next crucial part of the peace process: successfully reintegrating them into society. But the former combatants are vulnerable and tensions are high. Will the government be able to prevent the deterioration of Colombia's security situation andensure that demobilized fighters do not return to crime?

  • Weekly InSight: Narco-Terrorism in Latin America, How Real Is the Threat?

    Has the threat of "narco-terrorism" in Latin America been inflated?

    In our August 10 Facebook Live session, Senior Editor Mike LaSusa spoke with Simon Fraser University Research Associate Benoît Gomis about the myths and realities of the threat of "narco-terroism" in Latin America.

  • Reports Show Ex-FARC Criminal Cells Taking Shape Around Colombia

    FARC dissidents arrested in Nariño

    Colombia's FARC guerrillas are just weeks away from completing their demobilization, but reports of arms thefts, drug trafficking, forced recruitment and murders linked to FARC dissidents show how a new underworld is already taking shape in their wake.

  • DEA Agents Posed as FARC to Net International Arms Trafficker

    Faouzi Jaber pleaded guilty to US criminal charges on July 25

    A man from the Ivory Coast has pleaded guilty in a US court to offering support to undercover DEA agents posing as members of Colombia's FARC guerrilla group, raising questions about the handling of similar operations in the future in light of the FARC's ongoing demobilization.

Investigations

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Nariño, Colombia: Ground Zero of the Cocaine Trade

Nariño, Colombia: Ground Zero of the Cocaine Trade

The department of Nariño in southwest Colombia is the main coca-producing area in the country and in the world. It is a place scarred by poverty and years of armed conflict between guerrillas, the state and paramilitary groups. Perhaps nowhere else in the country are the challenges...

Trafficking Firearms in Honduras

Trafficking Firearms in Honduras

The weapons trade within Honduras is difficult to monitor. This is largely because the military, the country's sole importer, and the Armory, the sole salesmen of weapons, do not release information to the public. The lack of transparency extends to private security companies, which do not have...

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Murder

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Murder

  Life of a Sicario Anatomy of a Hit   The BACRIM's control over territories such as the north Colombian region of Bajo Cauca comes at the point of a gun, and death is a constant price of their power.

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Power

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Power

  The Bajo Cauca Franchise BACRIM-Land Armed Power Dynamics The BACRIM in places like the region of Bajo Cauca are a typical manifestation of Colombia's underworld today: a semi-autonomous local cell that is part of a powerful national network.

Counting Firearms in Honduras

Counting Firearms in Honduras

Estimates vary widely as to how many legal and illegal weapons are circulating in Honduras. There are many reasons for this. The government does not have a centralized database that tracks arms seizures, purchases, sales and other matters concerning arms possession, availability and merchandising. The laws surrounding...

Homicides in Guatemala: Introduction, Methodology, and Major Findings

Homicides in Guatemala: Introduction, Methodology, and Major Findings

When violence surged in early 2015 in Guatemala, then-President Otto Pérez Molina knew how to handle the situation: Blame the street gangs. 

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Money

InSide Colombia's BACRIM: Money

  Drugs Extortion Criminal Cash Flows Millions of dollars in dirty money circulate constantly around Bajo Cauca, flowing upwards and outwards from a broad range of criminal activities. The BACRIM are the chief regulators and beneficiaries of this shadow economy.

Closing the Gaps on Firearms Trafficking in Honduras

Closing the Gaps on Firearms Trafficking in Honduras

As set out in this report, the legal structure around Honduras' arms trade is deeply flawed. The legislation is inconsistent and unclear as to the roles of different institutions, while the regulatory system is insufficiently funded, anachronistic and administered by officials who are overworked or susceptible to...

Trafficking Firearms Into Honduras

Trafficking Firearms Into Honduras

Honduras does not produce weapons,[1] but weapons are trafficked into the country in numerous ways. These vary depending on weapon availability in neighboring countries, demand in Honduras, government controls and other factors. They do not appear to obey a single strategic logic, other than that of evading...